links for 2009-05-26

  • "jQuery is probably the fastest, most robust way to abstract basic low-level Javascript functionality that every Javascript devleoper needs. However, it really remains low-level and does not imply any structure or organization for larger scale Javascript applications.

    Working heavily with Sinatra, I realized that the simple route definitions and structure it provided could be a great fit with jQuery/JavaScript. Not only does it allow you to respond to specific URLs, but utilizing the URL hash (#) you can create single page applications that still respond to the back button in your browser (ala Gmail).

    I started off on this project thinking “It would be cool to implement Sinatra in JavaScript”. Sammy has become more then that, I’ve tried to follow JS and jQuery conventions instead of Ruby and its made for a small (< 20K) library for defining simple to complex applications."

links for 2009-05-25

Revealing Design Treasures From The Amazon »


On its surface, Amazon.com just seems like a large e-commerce site, albeit a successful one. Its design isn’t flashy, nor is it much to write home about. But deep within its pages are hidden secrets — secrets that every designer should know about.

If one looks closely at what the team at Amazon has built, it’s filled with innovative functionality and clever designs, all of which creates a delightful experience for its users and directly produces regular profits for its shareholders. But not all is perfect. Some design changes in the last few years have not been the success that the team had hoped for. Amazon’s exceptional qualities and imperfections are critical knowledge for any designer that wants to dig deep into what makes the site tick.

In this entertaining presentation, Jared will share some of UIE’s latest research into the hidden treasures of (the) Amazon.

You’ll learn:
+ The simple Yes/No question that increased revenues by more than $1 billion
+ The elegant subtlety of Amazon’s security system
+ Why Amazon’s business model is more than meets the eye (and why designers need to care)
+ The wins and losses that Amazon has had with social media functionality

Revealing Design Treasures From The Amazon »


On its surface, Amazon.com just seems like a large e-commerce site, albeit a successful one. Its design isn’t flashy, nor is it much to write home about. But deep within its pages are hidden secrets — secrets that every designer should know about.

If one looks closely at what the team at Amazon has built, it’s filled with innovative functionality and clever designs, all of which creates a delightful experience for its users and directly produces regular profits for its shareholders. But not all is perfect. Some design changes in the last few years have not been the success that the team had hoped for. Amazon’s exceptional qualities and imperfections are critical knowledge for any designer that wants to dig deep into what makes the site tick.

In this entertaining presentation, Jared will share some of UIE’s latest research into the hidden treasures of (the) Amazon.

You’ll learn:
+ The simple Yes/No question that increased revenues by more than $1 billion
+ The elegant subtlety of Amazon’s security system
+ Why Amazon’s business model is more than meets the eye (and why designers need to care)
+ The wins and losses that Amazon has had with social media functionality

links for 2009-05-12

links for 2009-05-08

  • "We know how hard it is to find quality freeware that is licensed for commercial work. We've done the hard work, hand-selecting these typefaces and presenting them in an easy-to-use format."
  • "HDTV processing lag ( also known as "input lag" ) is a phenomenon that is unique to modern televisions. In the pursuit of making the end picture better, TV manufacturers have built a myriad of video processing filters into their products. These filters have been designed to aesthetically benefit the playback of movies and broadcast TV.

    "This video processing lengthens the time between a signal being passed from its source ( your DVD player, antenna, or game system ) and the resulting picture being displayed on the screen."

links for 2009-05-04